TRonTR

December 26, 2007

End Of Year Sales & Hand Knotted Persian Rugs

Filed under: Economy — Tony @ 4:35 pm

Today I pushed through the throngs of bargain shoppers into the biggest shopping week of the year. There were many stories of brands scooped and the sense of satisfaction was self evident. It was a classic end of the year sale.

I got so caught up I popped into a major retailer to get some cheaper T shirts . I could have picked up some echo T shirts near my house- I didn’t. . Clearly I am also well trained- I am unfortunately blindly price sensitive!!!. I got sucked into the economic argument. I am a product of our time so I know how hard it is to make the connection between what I buy and real people, the absolute difference between synthetic made and one of a kind chemical free are rugs the environment and justice. Its very tough. Not to mention that sentence is a mouthful. How do we say Rugs that deliver justice to the environment and the people therein ??? (suggestions are welcome)

But I know what is right. In spite of myself in 2008 I am going to ramp up Rugman.com’s organic, pesticide and chemical free purchases. As for Brands, well I will support artists who produce one of a kinds and I will be less price conscious. Or should I say I will work harder to appreciate the value and cost of hand knotted Persian rugs.

In 2008 you can expect linkage between your hank knotted rugs and the individual weavers. I want to make a connection between our unique Persian rugs and the weavers. I want us all to know that that when one buys a hank knotted Persian rug that you are buying a rug that it is unique and that has an artists name attached. Their names range from Mahsa’s, Farida, Aslan, Amir, Alexandra to many many more. Real people. I want to introduce you to the families and the weavers. Like you I want to know there is care and connection between what I consume and real people.

PS I met with a software company that may solve the issue of the connection between the artists of Persian rugs and the product of area rugs and carpets- look for it in 2008.

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4 Comments »

  1. I can’t help but agree that we ar ein a society that can not appreciate quality versus mass quantity. Some of the Persian Rug weavers spend over a year weaving a beautiful piece of art by hand, and it may sell for a few thousand dollars. Many people will look at that few thousand dollars and claim it to be too expensive, or “not worth it”. But I ask EVERYONE this: What is one year (or more) of your working life worth? If anyone can honestly say they will work for an entire year, or more, and be happy receiving a few thousand dollars for their hard work, then I invite you to claim these prices are high. For everyone else who feels their efforts are worth more than what they are paid, then I welcome you to the average, hard-working and talented Persian Rug weaver.

    Comment by Pipes McBuff — December 26, 2007 @ 10:46 pm

  2. It’s nice to see that someone is bringing the human aspect of these rugs to the forefront.

    Were it any other artform the pomp and circumstance that would surround these creations would be deafening.

    Persian Rugs are one of the best kept secrets I know. The people who DO know there merits and value are hooked (literally) for life and will pass these treasures along but what about everyone else?

    This may have something to do with the North American’s heavy dependency on advertising to alert them to the “next big thing”. It’s unfortunate but I am confident that as awareness spreads so will demand and appreciation, how could it knot!!!

    Comment by Chris — December 28, 2007 @ 11:43 am

  3. Hi. Very interesting reading. I love rugs too. I like the craftsmanship and the deep, rich colors. If you use area rugs, you can change the whole mood of a space by changing or adding a rug.

    Last Christmas I was able to get a handmade 9×12 persian rug. It was marked down 50% and then marked down again for end of year sale! A deep, rich burgundy.

    Comment by StyleSwag — December 28, 2007 @ 6:39 pm

  4. thank u

    Comment by trontr — March 24, 2008 @ 4:21 pm


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